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How Do Music Pirates Get Caught?

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Question: How Do Music Pirates Get Caught?
Peer-to-peer downloading, aka "P2P networking", is the most controversial activity on the Internet. Every day, millions of users trade millions of movies and songs without paying fees. Instead of purchasing CD's or movie tickets, these users enjoy the same experience for no cost. But there are legal consequences, and those consequences are ugly. Here is what happens...
Answer: Yes, P2P downloaders, you run the risk of getting taken to court. More likely than you winning a lottery, there is a fair chance that your computer's IP address will be tracked and reported to the MPAA (Motion Picture Association of America), the RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America), and/or various other copyright authorities. Once you are electronically caught trading copyrighted movies and songs, you will be likely be fined as part of a class-action suit.

How You Will Get Caught Downloading:

  1. There are various technical monitoring services who are employed by the MPAA, the RIAA, and various copyright and government authorities. They are paid to watchdog millions of users on the Internet.

  2. Through digital surveillance means, those third-party monitoring services or your ISP Internet Service Provider) will notice your large bandwidth use. You will then be regularly monitored and your downloads will be examined.

  3. Once these authorities deem your downloading to be a breach of copyright law, and once they decide that you are worth prosecuting, your real identity will then be clarified. This is when your ISP divulges your home address and contact information, either willingly or under threat by the prosecuting entity.

  4. You might be lucky enough to receive a warning email only. But if you are like some unlucky users, you will receive a threatening legal letter.



Related: Isohunt.com Law Suit - What It's Like to be Sued by the MPAA/CRIA.
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